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Dane in New York City
All we have

Dane in New York City

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Dane in New York City

Scroll down to join Dane, resilient New Yorker through and through, on his mission to leave behind prison cells and call out protest movements, to trust himself and to cast his first vote in an American presidential election.

We link you back to the multimedia homepage at the end, but if you want to return earlier just click the "start" button in the side menu at any time.
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On parole

"I had joined the Ready Willing Enabled programme, which is a programme for ex-offenders to get re-established in the community and start them on a path to independent living.

I was recently released from prison last November, so in my mind I’m thinking about what I need to do on parole with this programme. And I was just proud of myself for staying on the right track. That was my mental space for the first few months of this year.

Then March hit…"
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"I want to say taking a turn for the worst… Things became challenging, because the pandemic throws all of my efforts into question. There’s no telling whether or not entities and organisations I utilise in order to get reestablished in the community will be available to me.

I’ve learnt, now at the age of 35, that when things become challenging not to stress out or throw caution to the wind. As everything around me seems to be crumbling, I’m going to have to stay strong. But there’s no telling what the end result of all this will be.”
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Photo by Arnold Plotnick.

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Getting ready

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Photo by Bruno Dell'Amore.

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Photograph: The Doe Fund.
Workers during lockdown.
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"My last period of incarceration was 5 ½ years. It was that period, which was my 3rd time, where I did a lot of work on myself intellectually and in introspection, looking at areas of my life that needed to be changed.

Because from a young age I always saw the great potential that I had, I just didn’t know how to exercise it, or even that it could be exercised when looking at the way young black men are being handled by different institutions, and the way we’re projected in the media.

So it took a while for me to realise I could choose to take the high road in all situations, and show others that they can avoid a lot of the stress like what I went through.”
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Foster homes

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“Now me and my sister are on bad terms. She has her own apartment but still unfortunately lives below the poverty line. 

My brother, who was adopted in his early teenage years and left our foster mother, is doing extremely well for himself. He’s about to turn 41 and he’s about to retire after making himself a millionaire out of the restaurant industry.

It’s crazy how vast the difference is between the three of us.”  

Photograph: Yola Monakhov Stockton (courtesy Home Alone Together collection).
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A tranquile spot

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Outside, looking in

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It's way deeper

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“I do respect the field of journalism and I do respect journalists and people who report the events that are going on in society around the world. It’s a very honorable position.

But when you have institutions who dictate what and how this information should be portrayed, that’s where the problem comes, cause I could give you all the information that’s in the story I’m trying to present.

But if you control the narrative, then, no, words and images are so malleable to really manipulate, that’s exactly what it is, it’s manipulation of minds and people.

To have - you know - the entire eight minutes of George Floyd’s on the news was unnecessary, you didn’t have to show the image of a weak black man crying to his mother and crying out to Jesus as he’s dying with a white officer’s knee on his neck. That was not necessary in order to tell the story.

But when you do something like that, not only is it heart wrenching for people to watch, but it also reinforces the image of weak black men in society. And people treat us as such, anywhere I go, on a daily basis I’m treated as if I’m inferior.

They have a specific race that is in their best interest to keep at a certain socioeconomic level and they will do anything in their power to ensure that happens. It sounds extremist but it is actually the reality and how do you get other people to believe that who are not impacted.”  

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First time voter

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Journey further...

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Overview
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Chapter 1 Dane in New York City

Dane in New York City.

Prologue

Chapter 4 Foster homes

Foster homes.

Foster Home 2

Chapter 5 A tranquile spot

A tranquile spot.

Chapter 6 Outside, looking in

Outside, looking in.

Dane's BLM videos

Chapter 7 It's way deeper

It's way deeper.

It's way deeper.

Chapter 8 First time voter

First time voter.

Chapter 9 Journey further...

All We Have

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  • Contributor: Dane Jones
    Directed by: Dan Hodgson and Julia Alcamo
    Photographs provided by: Dane Jones, The Doe Fund, Bruno Dell'Amore, Arnold Plotnick, Yola Monakhov Stockton (courtesy Home Alone Together)
    Videos provided by: Dane Jones
    Illustration by: Ewa Ferdynus

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